Calendar

Jun
29
Fri
Steven Metz
Jun 29 @ 10:00 pm – 11:30 pm

The high-energy music of Steven Metz and his band has found inspiration from a variety of sources. Born in the mountains of North Carolina, raised in the swamps of Florida, blessed by Memphis blues, and refined in Nashville, TN, his visceral writing style presents listeners with powerful lyrics and memorable melodies. The results are songs that can be gritty and soulful, edgy and energetic, or introspective and emotional. Brilliant entertainers at heart, Steven Metz and the band maintain an active tour schedule, and can be found at fairs and festivals, charity events, and venues across the southeast. Past performances include the Pompano Beach Seafood Fest, Memphis Italian Festival, and the Pepsi Gulf Coast Jam Southern Original Challenge. Armed with an impressive list of covers, the Steven Metz Band blends classic and contemporary country, rock, and popular standards to provide audiences with memorable, dynamic and wildly entertaining shows! Steven’s music is a great choice for the avid country fan seeking a new and exciting musical experience.

 

$5 cover, 21+ after 9pm

https://www.facebook.com/events/2050786235203759/

Jul
27
Fri
Time Sawyer w/ Scott Moss Band at Live on the Green
Jul 27 @ 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Live on the Green brings FREE, live musical performances to Uptown Charlotte’s First Ward Park! Bring your friends and family, enjoy local food vendors and local craft beer, and take in the sights and sounds of Uptown.

Our performers for July 27 are Scott Moss Band (7 PM) and Time Sawyer.

Scott from the Scott Moss Band is a singer/songwriter from Shelby, NC. He has played with western North Carolina favorites Moonshine Jenny and Evergreen, and joined Big Daddy Love in 2012. His dynamic stage presence and easy going nature creates a fantastic experience for the whole crowd!

Time Sawyer blends a grassroots feel with heart-felt lyrics to put on quite a show. From introspective ballads to high-energy crowd pleasers, Time Sawyer’s songs land in a sweet spot where folk, alt-country and rock gather together.

You can view the full lineup for this year’s Live on the Green series here: https://meck.co/2EFzN2h

https://www.facebook.com/events/148652532637926/

Jul
31
Tue
Josh Ritter
Jul 31 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Josh Ritter‘s acclaimed 20-year career as a songwriter and musician reaches new heights with the release of his ninth full-length album, Gathering. Along with his loyal bandmates, the Royal City Band, Josh returned to the studio with more songs than he’d ever had before at one time. Reenergized after a recent collaboration with legendary musician Bob Weir (who also contributes vocals and guitar to a song on Gathering) and –at the same time — tired of living in the shadow of his earlier self, Josh felt charged with exploring the possibility of cutting himself loose from his own and others’ expectations.  In his words, “I began with an exciting sense of dissatisfaction, and what emerged, as I began to find my voice, was a record full of storms. I still can’t tell what era these stories are from. They feel part roustabout, part psalm to me.”

 
Aug
4
Sat
Live Music with Jay Mathey
Aug 4 @ 4:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Jay Mathey will be performing live music!

We’re serving everything from $4 Ale’s FRESH Margaritas, $2.50 Bud Light, and MIMOSA MADNESS; $3 mimosas OR $12 bottles with free juice!

Join us at 1600 at Montford Drive!

Aug
11
Sat
Lucinda Williams/Steve Earle/Dwight Yoakam
Aug 11 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Show 7pm. Doors 6pm. This is an outdoor venue with no seats under cover The show will take place rain or shine. All dates, acts, & ticket prices subject to change without notice. All tickets are subject to applicable service fees via all points of sale. For Box, Suite and Season Ticket information, click here

Sale Dates and Times:

Public Onsale : Fri, 30 Mar 2018 at 10:00 AM

Dwight Yoakam Artist Presale : Mon, 26 Mar 2018 at 10:00 AM

Lucinda Williams Artist Presale : Mon, 26 Mar 2018 at 10:00 AM

Steve Earle Artist Presale : Mon, 26 Mar 2018 at 10:00 AM

Live Nation Mobile App Presale : Thu, 29 Mar 2018 at 10:00 AM

Citi® Cardmember Presale : Tue, 27 Mar 2018 at 10:00 AM

Live Nation Presale : Thu, 29 Mar 2018 at 10:00 AM

Ticketmaster Presale : Thu, 29 Mar 2018 at 10:00 AM

Citi® Cardmember Preferred Tickets : Fri, 30 Mar 2018 at 10:00 AM

Dwight Yoakam VIP Experience Presale : Mon, 26 Mar 2018 at 10:00 AM

SiriusXM Presale : Wed, 28 Mar 2018 at 10:00 AM

Dwight Yoakam VIP Experience Onsale : Fri, 30 Mar 2018 at 10:00 AM

https://www.facebook.com/events/155688438583366/

Aug
17
Fri
Live Music with Jay Mathey
Aug 17 @ 9:00 pm – 11:30 pm

TGIF! Join us for live music with Jay Mathey.

Our drink specials are $4 All Draft Beers, $5 Tito’s Vodka Drinks, and $6 green tea shots!

Join us at 1600 at Montford Drive.

Aug
31
Fri
Live Music with Jay Mathey
Aug 31 @ 9:00 pm – 11:30 pm

Start your weekend with live music by Jay Mathey!

Our drink specials are $4 All Draft Beers, $5 Tito’s Vodka Drinks, and $6 green tea shots!

Join us at 1600 at Montford Drive.

Sep
27
Thu
Time Sawyer at River Jam
Sep 27 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

The U.S. National Whitewater River Center’s River Jam is a great way to spend your weekend! Free concerts take place every Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening from May 3th, 2018, to September 29th.  The music will go from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Admission is free. Parking is $6 per car. 

Oct
5
Fri
Fall Festival
Oct 5 @ 4:00 pm – Oct 6 @ 10:00 pm

Kick off the autumn season with us at Fall Festival. This year’s festival features Cider Sampling and the always entertaining and exciting BYOB (Build Your Own Boat) Competition, where participants create their own river-worthy vessels and put them to the test with a trip down the whitewater competition channel. Take part in The Scrambler Obstacle Trail Race or a yoga practice under the trees, before enjoying the sights and sounds of one of our final musical performances of the year.

For more information, please visit the Festival & Concert FAQs.

SCHEDULE:

Friday, October 5, 2018:
4:00pm – BYOB mandatory check-in, boat drop off, float test, and style judging begins
5:00pm – The Scrambler Obstacle Trail Race Packet Pick-up
7:00pm – The Scrambler Obstacle Trail Race Packet Pick-up ends
7:00pm – River Jam
8:00pm – BYOB mandatory check-in, boat drop off, float test, and style judging ends

Saturday, October 6, 2018:
9:00am – The Scrambler: Obstacle Trail Race
9:30am- Yoga
11:30am – Yoga
12:00pm – Build Your Own Boat Competition begins
4:00pm – Build Your Own Boat Competition ends
4:00pm – Cider sampling begins
7:00pm – Live Music
8:00pm – Cider sampling ends

https://www.facebook.com/events/374801556305772/

Oct
30
Tue
Elle King, Cordovas
Oct 30 @ 8:00 pm

Elle King, is an American singer, songwriter, and actress. Her musical style encompasses country, soul, rock and blues. In 2012, King released her debut EP, The Elle King EP, on RCA. The EP track ‘Playing for Keeps’ is the theme song for VH1’s Mob Wives Chicago series. She released her debut album, Love Stuff on February 17, 2015.The album produced the US top 10 single ‘Ex’s & Oh’s’, which earned her two Grammy Award nominations. King has also toured with acts such as Of Monsters and Men, Train, James Bay (singer), The Dixie Chicks, and Michael Kiwanuka. She is the daughter of actor and comedian Rob Schneider and former model London King. She currently resides in Los Angeles.

Nov
3
Sat
Boy Named Banjo
Nov 3 @ 8:00 pm

Born and raised Nashville, TN

Barton Davies – vocals, banjo
William Reames – vocals, guitar, harmonica
Willard Logan- vocals, mandolin acoustic/electric guitar
Sam McCullough – vocals, drums
Ford Garrard – vocals, bass

Long before Boy Named Banjo, two of the founding members of the genre-breaking band grew up a mile down the road from each other in Nashville. William Reames and Willard Logan both picked up the guitar at an early age, took lessons from the same teacher in town, went to the same school, and even played in the same middle school band together. 

A shared love for bluegrass, folk, and singer/songwriter music sparked a different musical friendship for Reames between him and banjo player, Barton Davies. Before long, the two youngsters enthusiastically bounced songs off each other and discovered some of their favorite bands like The Steel Drivers, John Hartford, and The Infamous Stringdusters together. In no time at all, they were writing and performing songs of their own, an at the age of 16, they formed their own band. Only, they needed a mandolin player. That’s when they called Logan – and the two longtime friends, and now, Davies, were bandmates once again. 

Nov
4
Sun
Nicki Bluhm, Gill Landry (from Old Crow Medicine Show)
Nov 4 @ 8:00 pm

After nearly a decade spent with the Gramblers, and recent high-profile collaborations (Phil Lesh, Infamous StringDusters, Ryan Adams), and a split from her husband and musical mentor, vocalist and songwriter NickiBluhm is stepping out on her own with her new album, TO RISE YOU GOTTA FALL. The songs were written over a two-year period in Bluhm’s life and chronicle her fundamental life changes, which found the West Coast native living in Nashville, TN.

“These songs are the conversations I never got to have, the words I never had the chance to say, and the catharsis I wouldn’t have survived without,” she says. Recorded in Memphis, TN at legendary Sam Phillips Recording, Bluhm brought in producer Matt Ross-Spang (Margo Price, Jason Isbell), for these live band, analog sessions. The studio band includes Will Sexton (guitar), Ross-Spang (guitars), Ken Coomer (drums and percussion), Al Gamble (Hammond B3), Rick Steff (piano), Dave Smith (bass), with Sam Shoup (string arrangements) and various special guests.  TO RISE YOU GOTTA FALL tells the story of a woman searching for light among darkness and reveals her emergence as a powerful songwriter and vocalist of great depth and immediacy. 

Nov
8
Thu
Colter Wall
Nov 8 @ 8:00 pm
Colter Wall is a prairie-born songwriter from Saskatchewan, Canada. Wall’s inaugural EP, Imaginary Appalachia, continues to keep him a non-stop, buzzed-about young artist and has evoked visceral reactions from industry veterans, his musical heroes and peers, as well as a loyal and quickly-growing grassroots fan base. His signature baritone vocal is paired with sparse, beautiful old-soul songwriting inspired by artists like Townes Van Zandt, Blaze Foley, Emmylou Harris & Waylon Jennings.
Nov
10
Sat
The Dirty Guv’nahs
Nov 10 @ 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm

An Evening with THE DIRTY GUV’NAHS at Neighborhood Theatre

511 E 36th St, Charlotte, North Carolina 28205 

 

The Dirty Guv’nahs are an American Southern rock band from Knoxville, Tennessee. Known for enthusiastic live shows, the band was continually named the Best Band in Knoxville by readers of the alternative newspaper, Metro Pulse

Nov
24
Sat
The Bob Fleming Duo, Problem Addict & The Whiskey Predicament
Nov 24 @ 4:00 pm

Local Only Saturday celebrates the return of Birdsong Brewing Co.‘s MEXICALI CHOCOLATE STOUT with a FREE BAR ROOM MATINEE SHOW on Saturday November 24th featuring:
The Bob Fleming Duo
Problem Addict (Audrey Ayers of the mineral girls
and The Whiskey Predicament (singer/songwriter/guitarist Nate Fey)
$4 MEXICALI PINT CANS ALL DAY LONG plus $2 Mickey’s Grenades, $3 Modelo Especial, $4 well drinks, $5 Fireball, $7 Espolon Tequila & more!
BAR OPENS AT 4:00 PM & MUSIC STARTS AT 4:30ISH
AGES 18 & UP WELCOME
NO COVER CHARGE BEFORE 7:00 PM

Dec
2
Sun
Amanda Shires with Cory Branan
Dec 2 @ 8:00 pm

“It’s all rock & roll – no golf!” is how acclaimed singer/songwriter/violinist Amanda Shires describes her electrifying fifth album, To The Sunset. She’s borrowed a lyric from the effervescent track “Break Out the Champagne,” one of ten deftly crafted songs that comprise her powerful new recording. The Texas-born road warrior, new mom, and recently minted MFA in creative writing has mined a range of musical influences to reveal an Amanda Shires many didn’t know existed. “Isn’t it refreshing?” Shires asks. Indeed. Distorted electric guitars, effects pedals, swirling keys and synths, and rockin’ rhythms certainly suit Shires’ visceral songcraft and lilting soprano.

It’s been a jam-packed eighteen months since the release of Shires’ critically hailed My Piece of Land: constant touring with her band and as a member of husband Jason Isbell’s 400 Unit; finishing her MFA, after her laptop and thesis were stolen on the road; and winning the Americana Association’s 2017 Emerging Artist award – all while nurturing a toddler. Armed with stacks of journals and an autoharp originally owned by venerable songwriter/producer Paul Kennerley, she wrote a batch of new songs in a flurry of focus and enforced solitude – in a closet at the Shires/Isbell rural abode. “With a two-year-old running around, there’s nowhere to hide,” Shires explains. While Isbell watched their daughter, she wrote from 10 am till midnight: “I just started writing and tearing apart my journals and taping the parts I liked to the wall, and shredding the rest and putting it into my compost, which I then feed to my garden.”

She reconvened with Land’s producer Dave Cobb (Isbell; Sturgill Simpson) at Nashville’s historic sound-drenched RCA Studio A, with likeminded sonic adventurers, drummer Jerry Pentecost and keyboardist Peter Levin, alongside Isbell on guitar and Cobb on bass. Of course, she brought the fiddle she’s been playing since a teen, touring with Western swing stalwarts, the Texas Playboys. Only this time, she added effects pedals, distorting the instrument with which she’s accompanied Billy Joe Shaver, John Prine, and Todd Snider into something otherworldly. “I had never tried pedals before,” says Shires, “and I wanted to change my fiddle sound. I’ve been playing this instrument the same way for so long, and playing with pedals is so fun for me!” Likewise, she also revisited an early original, her hook-laden “Swimmer,” with pianist Levin’s “miles of keyboard that sound so huge.”

While writing such stunners as the enchanting “Parking Lot Pirouette,” haunting “Charms,” and raucous “Eve’s Daughter,” she thought about their sonics. “I explained to Dave that I wanted the songs to have atmosphere,” Shires recalls. “That the album was going to be sort of poppy, and that I was doing that to bring some sunshine into the world, cause it’s pretty dark right now.” As she sings in her empowering “Take on the Dark,” buoyed by bouncy bass, machine-gun drumming, and swirling synth: “Worry can be a tumbling tumultuous sea/with all its roaring and its breaking/How ‘bout you be the waves/too unafraid to even be brave/and see yourself breaking out of this place.”

Shires is renowned for her carefully crafted, evocative songs. Just as she spent her youth as a journeyman fiddle player, Shires brought years of studying the masters to her songwriting. Impromptu encouragement from Shaver, for example, inspired her to take up the pen. “Before touring with Billy Joe Shaver, I was only a side person,” Shires avers. “I wasn’t a songwriter. I was observing. Then I made a couple of demo songs so people would know I could sing, and he said, ‘These are good songs. You should go be a songwriter in Nashville.’ I thought he was firing me, and I said, ‘No! I really like my job playing the fiddle. It’s my favorite thing to do.’ Then a year later, I decided he was right.” 

Her influences include Leonard Cohen and John Prine, the latter of whom has been a mentor. “I was talking to John Prine while I was writing this record,” says Shires, “and he was talking about how using images that actually happened to you makes the songs true. Also, if you use images that you can see daily, it’s more relatable.” Shires took his advice to heart in such memorable tracks as “Break Out the Champagne.” “It’s all true!” says the resilient Shires. The near-plane crash over Newfoundland, her BFF Kelly’s fears about our apocalyptic times, another friend’s heavy breakup.

Shires says she also uses songwriting as a way to “get through my own emotional stuff, which is cheaper than a therapist.” An example is the Hammond B3-fueled “White Feather” with its “scarecrow” imagery. The idea struck when she experienced “cat calling that’s become okay again,” then expanded to include her thoughts on climate change and capitalism, “but it’s bigger than that,” Shires clarifies. “The song deals with fear and all the ways it discourages the expression of our individual identities. It’s about the walls we put up to protect ourselves and the way those walls become prisons.” In the synth-ful “Mirror, Mirror,” she examines self-doubt, via the catchy refrain, “Show me something different/Than the mirror on the wall.” And shimmering guitars frame “Leave It Alone” with such realizations as “What you think you’re feeling is crushing at most.”

Other songs were derived from the lives of her mother and father, including 21st century Flannery O’Connor style album closer, “Wasn’t I Paying Attention?” “True story,” Shires asserts. “I couldn’t make it up.” The gripping tale, with its crunchy rock & roll soundtrack, will leave listeners on the edge of their seats, while tapping their toes.

As a whole, To The Sunset, says Shires, “is meant to be a positive thing. Acknowledging your past, and at sunset, your hope for a new day. ‘To The Sunset’ sounds like a toast: This day is over, we don’t know what’s in the future, but it’s hopeful, I think.”

Shires has drawn from her own past on To The Sunset – and pointed the way to her future. She has set the bar high – sonically and lyrically – and she’s jumped over it.

Dec
7
Fri
Jill Andrews: A Night of Original and Holiday Favorites
Dec 7 @ 7:30 pm

It starts with the voice. Before you notice the words, before you detect the gently curling melodies tugging them along, this is what hits you first: It’s warm and rich and touched with a soft Southern twang, as likely to swing down into its earthy lower register as arch upwards into a hopeful trill; it’s steady and sure but flecked with a certain weary sadness that stops you dead, draws you near. It’s beautiful. It knows something. 

This voice is Jill Andrews, who’s been singing her whole life: as a little girl in Johnson City, Tenn., as a camp counselor plucking out three chords on an acoustic guitar under swaying pine trees, as one-half of The Everybodyfields — and, since 2009, as an increasingly formidable singer/songwriter making her way on her own. 

The Knoxville-based Andrews crafts beguiling, startlingly intimate songs that merge her voice with her effortless, classic-pop sensibility and keen eye for human drama — all the unspoken truths between lovers, devastating confessions whispered to friends, silent prayers offered up during the longest, loneliest nights. A smart, subtle tunesmith and a gently wise songwriter, Andrews’ songs shuffle in and settle down with little fanfare, then quietly go about the business of ripping your heart straight out of your chest. 

And her full-length debut, The Mirror out June, 7th, is the perfect introduction to her ever-deepening talents and charms. 

‘The Mirror was written over a period of time when I was holding on dearly to a relationship that I knew was over,’ Andrews says of the new LP. ‘I felt like I was forever trudging through the darkness, but then came springtime, and with it, the beautiful sunlight.’ 

Teaming up with producers Scott Solter (Superchunk, The Crooked Jades) in North Carolina and Neilson Hubbard (Glen Phillips, Matthew Perryman Jones) in Nashville, The Mirror nudges Andrews’ folksy roots into a more decidedly pop direction. Her clear, lovely voice sounds more adventurous than ever, and on tunes like ‘Blue Sky,’ ‘A Little Less’ and the album’s title track, her words are wrapped in shimmering piano lines and a collage of background harmonies. It starts with the voice. Before you notice the words, before you detect the gently curling melodies tugging them along, this is what hits you first: It’s warm and rich and touched with a soft Southern twang, as likely to swing down into its earthy lower register as arch upwards into a hopeful trill; it’s steady and sure but flecked with a certain weary sadness that stops you dead, draws you near. It’s beautiful. It knows something. 

Yarn
Dec 7 @ 8:00 pm

Even the most dire circumstance can offer opportunity for new beginnings. Just ask singer/songwriter Blake Christiana or any of the other members of the once Brooklyn based Americana band called Yarn. At least that’s the conclusion they came to after a period of real life challenges that left the band splintered and unsure of their forward trajectory. Internal tensions were simmering. A new album was scrapped. A major move from Brooklyn to North Carolina added to the uncertainty. For a band that seemed forever on the verge of a big breakthrough, the future suddenly seemed cloudy. 

“We were dealing with real life issues,” Christiana explains. “Broken relationships, a sense of having to regroup and put some things — and people — behind us. That’s what I was writing about lyrically in the new songs and it became kind of a catharsis. Nothing was contrived. We didn’t have to relate to it in the third person. We were living these circumstances, and that gave us the impetus and inspiration to share our sentiments. Ultimately those setbacks and difficulties led to new opportunities and allowed a little light to shine through.”

Christiana’s referring to the band’s album, the boldly optimistic This Is the Year. A seamless blend of vibrant, inspired, back porch melodies and narrative, descriptive lyrics that detail the challenges faced when one’s life is jolted off its bearings, the record documents in detail the band’s determination to move forward while balancing precariously on a line that forms a border between love and hate. It’s an album about re-evaluating relationships, making tough choices and sometimes skirting the rules, a tack that was inspired by musicians they admire — Waylon and Willie, Merle Haggard and other Texas troubadours with a distinctly renegade reputation.

For Christiana, bassist Rick Bugel, singer guitarist Rod Hohl and drummer Bobby Bonhomme, it meant taking a fresh look at where they were versus what they wanted to accomplish. Bonhomme had recently returned to the fold after an extended absence, while another longtime member was purged. “The tension suddenly dissolved,” Christiana says, giving an audible sigh of relief. “Suddenly we were free to express ourselves without having to look back over our shoulders. This album is our emancipation.” 

“I think this album is a stepping stone for us, one we desperately needed,” Bonhomme adds. “It marks a much needed change in direction. The title is appropriate. This is the year, because now we can look forward. This is who we are. For the first time in a very long time we’re not afraid of taking chances. The bond between each of the band members has never been better, and it’s that camaraderie that helped us move forward and created the kind of passion that is evident in this album.” 

“This is our best album yet,” Bugel adds. “This is also the happiest the band’s ever been. The chemistry we shared in the studio and on the stage is nothing short of amazing.”

That’s certainly no small accomplishment, especially for a band that spent two years honing their chops during a Monday night residency at the famed Kenny’s Castaway in New York’s Greenwich Village. In effect, it allowed them to rehearse onstage, mostly in front of audiences that often ranged in size from five to fifty people on any given night. Five studio albums followed — Yarn(2007), Empty Pockets (2008), Come On In (2010), Almost Home (2012) and Shine the Light On (2013). The band then took to the road, playing upwards of 170 shows a year and sharing stages with such superstars as Dwight Yoakam, Charlie Daniels, Marty Stuart, Allison Krauss, Leon Russell, Jim Lauderdale and The Lumineers. They performed at any number of prestigious venues — Mountain Stage, Daytrotter, the Orange Peel in Asheville, the Fox Theater in Boulder, the 9:30 Club in D.C, South by Southwest, the Strawberry Festival, Rhythm and Roots, Meadowgrass and more, eventually accumulating a total of 1,000 shows, half a million miles and performances in 32 states. They’ve driven nonstop, made countless radio station appearances, driven broken-down RVs and watched as their van caught fire. They’ve paid their dues and then some, looking forward even as they were forced to glance behind.

Indeed, the accolades piled up quickly along the way. They received a Grammy nomination, garnered nods from the Americana Music Association, placed top five on both Radio and Records and the AMA album charts, garnered airplay on Sirius FM, I Tunes, Pandora, CNN, CMT and Roughstock.com, and also accorded the “Download of the Day” from Rolling Stone. Shine the Light On found shared song writing credits with John Oates (the Oates of Hall & Oates fame), and when audiences expressed their admiration, it brought the band a populist following of diehard devotees, popularly known as “the Yarmy.” 

As odd as that might seem, it’s proof positive that Yarn have made their mark, and in their dealing with emotions, scars and circumstances, they find themselves in a position to share those experiences with others who have sifted through similar sentiments. 

In an era of click-bait and sound bites, Yarn provides a real experience.  They’re not just a live band, they’re a band for people who want to live.

Jan
26
Sat
Brent Cobb and Them
Jan 26 @ 8:00 pm

Brent Cobb didn’t set out to write an album that feels and sounds like the place he grew up. But now that the grooves have been cut in his debut LP, Shine on Rainy Day, there’s no denying the people, the places and the vibe of his southcentral Georgia home infuse almost every song.

‘It just is Georgia,’ Brent says in his musical drawl. ‘It’s just that rural, easy-going way it feels down there on a nice spring evening when the wind’s blowing warm and you smell wisteria, you know?’

It’s quiet down there where he’s from in Ellaville — ‘population 1,609’ — laid back and forgotten in the shadow of Atlanta and Savannah. The people have blue-collar values and believe in treating your neighbor like you want to be treated. They believe in curses and the dark finger of Fate and wield a sharp, dark sense of humor that sustains them through the hardest of times. Distant radio stations, roadside honkytonks made of cinderblock and back-porch picking sessions heavy on the backbeat predominate under Spanish moss-strewn live oaks and loblolly pines.

It was the perfect place to grow up.

‘Lord, when I die, let’s make a deal,’ Brent sings on the album’s swirling thesis statement, ‘South of Atlanta,’ ‘lay me down in that town where time stands still.’

Shine on Rainy Day is an album Brent’s been trying to make for a decade, enlisting his cousin and fellow Georgian, Dave Cobb, the Grammy Award-winning producer whose Elektra Records imprint Low Country Sound is home to the album.

Brent wanted to record an album that felt Southern, though not the kind of Southern you might expect. Neither Southern rock nor mainstream country, the sound sits somewhere on the wide bandwidth that exists between the two. Cousin Dave helped him find the right vibe, full of blue-eyed soul, country funk and the kind of swamp boogie sounds that predominated pop in the 1960s and early 1970s. There’s a reason Georgia was always on Ray Charles’ mind, after all.

Feb
22
Fri
Time Sawyer
Feb 22 @ 8:00 pm
Time Sawyer blends a grassroots feel with heart-felt lyrics to put on an entertaining show. From introspective ballads to high-energy crowd-pleasers, Time Sawyer’s songs land in that rootsy sweet spot where folk, alt-country, and rock gather for a good time.

Time Sawyer is interested in “real people and real songs” and that’s just what the listener finds in their music – a sense of realness. Time Sawyer blends a grassroots feel with heart-felt lyrics to put on an entertaining show. From introspective ballads to high-energy crowd-pleasers, Time Sawyer’s songs land in that rootsy sweet spot where folk, alt-country, and rock gather for a good time.

The folk rock band’s name reflects the pull between the past and the future. The character Tom Sawyer evokes the rural background and love of home that the band shares. Time is a muse for songwriting; it’s the thread that runs through life, bringing new experiences and giving us a sense of urgency, while still connecting us with our past.

Time Sawyer has performed on the stages of some of the Southeast’s most iconic festivals, including Merlefest, Floydfest, Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion, Rhythm n’ Blooms, Carolina in the Fall and IBMA’s Bluegrass First Class. They’ve shared bills with Langhorne Slim, Eric Krasno, John Moreland, Steep Canyon Rangers, The Wood Brothers, Susto, and many more.

The memorable lyrics and strong melodies result in songs that will stay in your head long after the music stops. Time Sawyer continues to develop a loyal and growing fan base. Whether they’re playing in an intimate listening room or a large outdoor festival, their goal is to forge a face-to-face connection with the audience so that they become friends who happen to be fans.

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